Reflections from CJS’s “What We Learned Teaching Social Media” webcast

I recently chanced upon a webcast hosted by the Columbia Journalism School (@columbiajourn) on “What We Learned Teaching Social Media.” The syllabus for the graduate-level class is available for reference. The speakers were some of the best in the business:

Having organized workshops for journalism students at the University of Washington on social media, I was interested to find out how other people are engaging student journalists and helping them discover the potential for social media in journalism.

During the conversation I asked via Twitter (hashtag: #cjsoc), “What’s the best way to teach social media to student journalists?” Jennifer Preston said she likes to have students work on a specific project or Tweet a specific event. Examples she used were election coverage and the aftermath of Haiti. I was reminded of the students in Prof. Roger Simpson’s class who live-Tweeted President Obama’s visit to boost Sen. Patty Murray’s re-election campaign.

Preston said the class debriefs after the event by having volunteers share their feeds and discussing what worked and what didn’t.

Each class also develops a list of social-media guidelines.

The shared syllabus is a wealth of resources and I encourage everyone to take a look at it. It includes tools, links to articles about journalism and social media, and links to case studies. It also includes links to articles about etiquette and metrics.

A few notable examples in the syllabus:

1. Examples of journalists using Twitter (http://sreetips.tumblr.com/post/87435969/twitter):

2. @mashable’s Twitter guide: twitter.mashable.com

3. See a collection of 80+ social-media policies, compiled by SocialMediaGovernance.com

4. 8 ways to use social media in the newsroom (by J.D. Lasica and Barbara Iverson)

5. The emergence of location.

6. Journalists in the social media ecosystem: Journalist as curator, as community manager

7. What is a personal brand and why it is important (Poynter – Lavrusik)

8. 10 Commandments of Twitter Etiquette

9. How much of your life is too much to share online? (Verne Kopytoff,
S.F Chronicle, April 27, 2009)

Digital journalism class examines changing news industry

Communication professor Kathy Gill’s digital journalism class explored the future of news and created multimedia stories during the spring. Check out their insightful blog, The Future of News.

Here are links to their individual projects:

Adam: UW Student Serves As Translator in Ecuador

Andrew: Duncan’s Glorious Summer

Jeff: Raiders Softball

Michelle: Interview With Potential Communication Student

Paul: Spot.us – Crowdfunded Journalism

Reisha: Twitter As PR Tool

Ryan: Magical Heroine

Sarah: New Technologies in the 13th Coast Guard District

Scott: Where’s my paycheck? Thoughts on the future of journalism